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work up
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Seslendir:
Okunuşu: / wəːk ʌp / Okunuş kuralları
Dil: İngilizce
Hecelenişi: work up
Ekler: works up/worked up/work·ing up


Tanımı:

bürümek;
heyecanlandırmak, kamçılamak, kurmak;
düzenlemek, tanzim etmek, yapmak, geliştirmek.

work up için örnek cümleler:

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  • "Betty, you'll be ill if you're going to get all worked up like this," scolded Mrs. Guerin, for Betty was crying as she hung up the receiver. "I never saw you so unstrung, my dear. You won't be fit to go to your uncle when he does send for you. I wonder if the doctor hadn't better see you?"
  • Hang it all! said the chief-inspector. "People don't work up a whole business of this sort, without seeing something ahead of them ... solid profits."
  • I believe that it must have been some intimation from Ala which finally led Edmund to hold his course toward the mountains, but in a direction different from that which led to the mines. When he had once chosen this direction he worked up the speed to fully a hundred miles an hour, and all were compelled to go inside on account of the wind created by our rush through the air. We held on thus for five hours. During this time Edmund spread a repast made up of dishes chosen from the supplies in the car, and, of course, utterly strange to our guests. They found them to their taste, however, and were delighted with Edmund's entertainment. We spent a long time at our little table, and I was surprised at the variety of delicious things which Edmund managed to extract from his stores. There was even some champagne, and I noticed that Edmund urged it upon Ingra, who, nothing loth, drank enough to make him decidedly tipsy, a fact which was not surprising since we had found that the wines of Venus were very light, and but slightly alcoholized.
  • What are you thinking about, Cinder? said Mike one day, when they were out together, after a long, hard morning's work up at the Ladelles, over algebra and Latin, with the tutor who was resident at the Mount, the Doctor sharing, however, in the cost. "You seem to have been so moony and stupid lately."
  • "Why, boy," continued the other, resuming his perambulation of the deck, "explosions have sometimes been heard for hundreds, ay hundreds, of miles. I thought I heard one just now, but no doubt the unusual darkness works up my imagination and makes me suspicious, for it's wonderful what fools the imag--. Hallo! D'ee feel that?"
  • He found a place to stay in a nearby inn - a large and rambling establishment clearly prospering from the presence of so many men working up a thirst during the day, and having the copper to spend on beer to slake that thirst in the evenings. Jean-Luc, who privately preferred to drink his beer heavily watered-down, found himself nursing his pint many an evening, in all of the taverns and public houses in the area, listening to tales and fables of all kinds.
  • Father's farm improved with astonishing rapidity and became quite a pleasant place. Some of the stumps rotted out, some we tore out and some were burned up. In these ways many had disappeared and it began to look like old land. It was rich and productive and, in truth, it looked as level as a house floor. Some seasons it was rather wet, not being ditched sufficiently to take the water off. Yet father raised large crops of corn, potatoes, oats and wheat. Wheat grew very large but sometimes ran too much to straw; some seasons, rust would strike it and then the grain would shrink, but as that and gets older, and the more the clay is worked up with the soil, the better wheat it raises. In my opinion it will be as good wheat land as the oak openings or prairies of the West for all time to come.
  • Wylie was working himself up to a rage, again. Considering how short he was though, there wasn't much of a distance for him to work up to. The hoverbus was crawling along at a snail's pace and the doltish, dunderhead of a driver had been stopping too often and too long at all the halts! He wished that the neutered numerologically-challenged narcissistic numskull would hurry up and get to Donagar instead of dawdling like a damned drowning duck draped in down diapers!
  • Give them a chance! said Shifty Pete. "They're young and inexperienced, so they don't know how to put out leaves yet. It's not an easy thing, putting out leaves. You have to work up dozens of chemical reactions just to get photosynthesis going! Better living with chemistry, and all that."
  • Yes, I can fancy that you are, said the officer; "and so am I anxious to get to my ship. We shall have some more work up the coast, I expect, with these slavers, though it does not pay when their ships are burnt. However, we must be satisfied at having reached some land, and found food and water. If we had not obtained water here, we might have dug each other's graves. We will go to that peak and look round, and judge of the size of our island. I should like to go all round it before I return to the boats--so come along."
  • Morning found the elephants gathered in the street outside Macklin's condominium, still trying to work up the courage to approach him.
  • "Certainly, Harry. Just touch the bell, and when Parker comes I will tell him what you want. I have got to work up this background, so I will join you later on. Don't keep Dorian too long. I have never been in better form for painting than I am to-day. This is going to be my masterpiece. It is my masterpiece as it stands."
  • Yes, it's clean, attractive and made up to date, said Ned. "The man who owns these outfits is working up some good routes. If you have anything to sharpen, now, I'll show you the kind of work we do."
  • Old silver-plated goods were made by taking a bar of copper and placing at top and bottom a thin slip of pure silver, which was made to adhere to the copper by heat. Then the silvered copper bar was passed through rolling mills till it was flattened to the necessary thickness, and came out with its due proportion of silver on both sides, ready for working up into shape, with the addition of pure silver finishings to the parts likely to be most worn.
  • I don't remember whether I thanked the Richmond man or not; it's likely not, as I was so much worked up that I didn't know what I was doing. I hastily told my companions what I had heard.
  • Like all the other horrible crime scenes you and I have worked up here Peter, this one will rob us of just a bit more of ourselves. It will take over our lives. Those around us will also suffer because of what we go through.’
  • This makes me even more breathless. I can't be imagining this. She could have gone by and left me sleeping. Perhaps I still have a chance. I'm working up to asking if I can take her out to dinner sometime but I take too long and she says,
  • Von Kluck is certainly worked up about it, remarked Harry as he noted the captain's distracted manner. "He's almost bughouse!"
  • Lazerek spun around. He saw nothing. It could possibly be a rat or other vermin, but he must be certain.He worked up an illumination orb to dispel the darkness.A yellow orb of light flared into existence above his head.
  • "Sure, Ill make something float," Gidas absent-mindedly raised his hand and simultaneously the student rose into the air.The Prope Opifex almost dropped his tablet and writing instrument as he began rising.He was indignant. Gidas smiled while looking around at the gathering crowd. The student worked up a spell and hacked at the magic Gidas was using, and could not break it.
  • Dan thought of the Captain's words as he crossed the ferry to New York. All through the day he had been filled with the pleasurable conviction that the morrow was a pretty decent sort of day to be ashore, and he had intended to work up to the joys thereof to the utmost of his capacity.
  • Now, I'd be sorry to miss that same myself, remarked Bob; "because he's got me worked up to top notch fever about it, and I wanted to try and read the sign he left behind him. I've sure heard a heap about that picture writing, and what fun scouts have trying to make out what it all means. But there don't seem to be anything out of the way on this same island, suh.
  • You have failed to do what I ... you to do. I told you that it was ... dangerous to bring the girls here. The letter of warning to Miss Stan ... did no good.... I want to warn you again and ... ... last time. Get your friends out of Hollyhill as soon as possible. I won't be responsible for what occurs. It makes no difference if you have given up your original purpose. Some of the men are so worked up that they are liable to do almost anything. If you can't get the rest out of town go yourself, or you may get hurt."
  • Ho, ho, that's right. She'd be a regular tortoise, said Mr. Clifford. "But why don't you make a couple of scaling ladders? I'll have the top hooks forged for you if you'll build the ladders. They'll be light and serviceable and you can work up a mighty spectacular drill with them."
  • Garon waved his arms working up a spell, when a flash of light shot out of the woods and knocked him from his feet.He fell to the ground and did not move.
  • And Johnny was taking them from her being careful not to get any blood on them but not quite careful enough and saying "Thanks yeah fine" and running now Eastward again toward campus feeling this gathering fear and becoming less convinced with every passing second despite no further evidence that Lyle was actually getting all worked up about nothing. And the girl was yelling after him "Hey! Your skateboard" and he was yelling back "Keep it!" and then he was leaning up against the door into the Computer Science work-lab and trying to catch his breath and wishing he could just stick his finger down his throat and puke up adrenaline.
  • By the way, Sir, it was Crowfoot's son that got into that trouble last night with that Macleod man. The old Chief is in town, too, in fact is outside just now and quite worked up over the arrest.
  • No, herr, said the guide quietly; "the climbing would be too steep, and there is a slope there which later on will be swept by loose stones. Better take to the snow again, then work up it."
  • "Emma," Jack manages again. The grief he feels is overwhelming. Yet, still he feels detached, as though this is merely a dream. There has been so much blood, death, and losshis mind cannot comprehend the reasoning behind any of it. All he remembers, all he knows is that he cared for Emmaloved her, even. Now, she was gone. All that remained was the body that her father had raped and choked to death. He cannot even work up enough strength within himself to feel the rage that he should feel. After everything he has been through, he knew it was foolish to even hope that she was still alive. Yet, hope he did. For better or worse, hope kept him going and brought him here. Now there is nothing to hope for, no reason to continue on. Jack brings himself back up to his knees.
  • As they made their way homeward, thoroughly worked up by the excitement of their adventure, Harry wondered whether his father would let him undertake this service Colonel Throckmorton had suggested. After all, he was not English, and he felt that his father might not want him to do it, although Mr. Fleming, he knew, sympathized strongly with the English in the war. He said nothing to Dick, preferring to wait until he was sure that he could go ahead with his plans.
  • That's a thought, said Neville. "You could work up a slogan like, 'I eat a haggis a day and look what big things I've got!'"
  • This is a love story, simple, tender and pretty as one would care to read. The action throughout is brisk and pleasing; the characters, it is apparent at once, are as true to life as though the author had known them all personally. Simple in all its situations, the story is worked up in that touching and quaint strain which never grows wearisome, no matter how often the lights and shadows of love are introduced. It rings true, and does not tax the imagination.--Boston Herald.
  • Say, I believe you've gone and struck the truth just as you nearly always do, old fellow, not by luck, but by figuring it out. To get the coast clear, then, this sly Todd Pemberton means to go on bringing in important news, and keeping poor old Chief Waller worked up to top-notch speed, chasing around down there after shadows! Yes, that must be the game they've got in hand; and perhaps that's what all those waves of handkerchiefs meant between the pilot of the little Mermaid, and the fellow we couldn't see, who was hidden in the bushes on Norton's Point.
  • And now it was Romeo's task to hold the multitude's illusion with deploring speeches; and to work up anew its breathless sympathy, at the news of Mercutio's death and that the furious Tybalt was coming back again.
  • Too bad Miss Amesbury had to miss it. Thus Agony echoed Migwan's earlier expression of regret as she walked down the Alley arm in arm with Migwan and Hinpoha after the first bugle. "She's been working up there on her balcony all evening, and didn't hear a bit of the singing. We were too far up the river."
  • Don set to work earnestly, and watched his companion, who cleverly twisted away at the gathered-up yarn, and then rolled his work up into a ball.
  • I could feel myself getting drowsy and realized there must have been some sort of sleeping aid in the balm. I should have been furious, but couldn't work up the energy for it. "What's the power source?"
  • Curiously, very few people get worked up about this uk situation compared to the numbers who wax indignant about eu fraud.
  • The Indians were now worked up to a condition of irresponsible madness. Another such impulse from the Medicine Man, and the thirsty knives would be quenched.
  • Aliens disguised as quacking elephants were lurking in the stairwell of Macklin's condo, working up the nerve to make him an offer.
  • There is not a dull chapter, nor, indeed, a dull page in the book; but the author has so carefully worked up his subject that the exciting deeds of his heroes are never incongruous or absurd.--Observer.
  • 'I'm just gonna pop to the river to wash my face and,' I shrugged and tried to work up a smile, 'De-stress for a moment.'
  • Work was easier on Bar U ranch after the big cattle shipment, but still there was plenty to do. Mr. Bellmore was busy working up his water irrigation project, in addition to helping Mr. Carson fight the Molick crowd. After a number of suits had been started Molick brought an action against the engineer for breach of contract.
  • Handshake deal, worked up between the two companies within the first few years of business, effectively cut the world in two.
  • Alright, i know - i must have a pretty boring life to get worked up about such trifles!
  • Tamas took this time to work up an attack on the city.As the final ceremony for the dead king was about to commence, Kitarssis warriors filled the streets of Rommel. Rexillion was just stepping onto a balcony to address his people when he spotted the enemy troops as they began hacking at the defenseless mourners at the back of the crowd.He ordered his troops to block all exits and slay every warrior in the city who belonged to Kitarssis. In a fit of rage, he later sent out a small band of men to make a path straight through to the city of Kitarssis.
  • Injin Charley intended evidently to work up a trade in buckskin during the coming winter. Although the skins were in poor condition at this time of the year, he tanned three more, and smoked them. In the day-time he looked the country over as carefully as did Thorpe. But he ignored the pines, and paid attention only to the hardwood and the beds of little creeks. Injin Charley was in reality a trapper, and he intended to get many fine skins in this promising district. He worked on his tanning and his canoe-making late in the afternoon.
  • "Looks like you wont do anything to save your husband from himself. So I may have to do it." I snapped the phone shut, cutting Jessie off for good, and started working up the nerve to shout my advice to Manny across the room. If he tried to rush the podium again, I would scream, "Stay put."
  • "Daddy please just tell me youll not try to stop me, not that Id let you." They smiled at each other; her words had been well metered. "Dad, no one wants to work up there. Yeah, its scary as hell, and yeah, if I get infected, thats it. No more Marthe."
  • A worked up Jenny whispered to me,"My grandma' goes to sleep at 9:30. She never wakes up, so I'll leave the door open for you."
  • They have domesticated them more thoroughly, I guess, the Northerner replied. "In time they may be worked up here in the same way, and when you consider how short a time the government has had to do what is already accomplished, it seems to me the result is wonderful. Of course, so far as traffic is concerned there are dogs enough, and they do the work in mighty good shape."
  • That's because it's true love, Polydoor, not some trick worked up by Nurse Jane and her Magic Cap. True love is a primal force, like insanity. It operates in a separate dimension, outside space and time.
  • When we returned to the dinner table, we finished our meal in silence. By the time I cracked open my fortune cookie, I had worked up a conspiracy theory that would make my sister proud.
  • The Mate hears this, as Martin intended he should, and scowls darkly at that ancient mariner. Martin will have his 'old iron' worked up for that before the watch is out. He's a hard case. Coffee is served out, and the crowd disperses. It is now broad daylight, and the sun is on the horizon.
  • Sid climbed down by the pueblo trail he had first discovered and worked up through the spruces up the valley, confident that he would soon find a way out and speculating on how to get down from the plateau above into the chasm where his camp was. But the rim walls of the box canyon offered him little encouragement. Three hundred feet above him they towered, with bare, stratified and perpendicular walls after the lower slopes of talus ended. The large spruces in the valley contented themselves with a root hold in the wet soil in its ravine. Nowhere did they come near enough to the cliffs to be of any use in climbing out.
  • My difficulty was that I couldn't really work up the proper amount of fear. If I really thought that I was in danger of imminent death, I would call everyone I knew for help. I just couldn't believe that these witches meant to kill me. Stupid maybe, but that's how I felt. This was America. People just don't go around kidnapping and murdering here. Ok, so, some people do, watch the news. But they are usually trailer trash psychotics, not successful business operators. Besides, I often daydreamed about being a superhero, or a bounty hunter, or a cool-headed person who conquered impossible situations. Now was my chance. I could handle this.
  • I'll make the story short, was the reply. "I'm a railroad section hand, an' was lookin' to be made a foreman on a section near New York. I had a pile of friends among the men just above me, and I believe I would have worked up pretty rapidly."
  • I'm going to send Alan McKinstra along to guide you. He knows that country like a book. You want to head for the lower pass, swing up Diable Caon, and work up in the headquarters of the Three Forks.
  • Hurrrah! shouted Bumpus, who had been so worked up during this struggle between his comrades and the greed of the elements, that he had hardly taken time to breathe.
  • Oscar, on the other hand, was oddly quiet. She guessed he was still upset about Systems Integrated, though she didn't know why he would get so worked up about a machine. Either that or he was planning something. She could not fathom the ways of that spirit. He'd disappear for a few days every once in a while, but mostly he hung around her as she worked, answering her questions in monosyllables.
  • She perused some of her favorite local shops including Beach Haven Resale, Antiques, Organics and Tennis, and worked up quite an appetite spending Hartwell's money, so she headed to the bagel place.
  • "What makes a man act so?" he says. "There's my fellow-man. Look at him! I'm sorry for him. Most of him had hard luck to be born, and yet when he gets in my way I just walk all over him. I can't help it. He's leathery and he's passive, my fellow-man. He goes to sleep in the middle of the road. When I ketch one of him, I kicks a hole in his trousers first, and then it occurs to me, 'My sufferin' brother! This is too bad!' Why, Pete Hillary was one of the dumbdest and leatheriest, and here's the Mayor's pink sojers been fillin' me with joy and sorrow, till I laughed from eleven till twelve, and been sheddin' tears ever since. Irish's been three times around his rosary before he got the scare kinks out of him, and between Irish bein' pathetic, and the Mayor and his sojers comin' out pink and going back jammed to the colour of canned salmon, my feelin's is worked up to bust. What makes a man act so? It must be he has cats in him."
  • I guess that would settle things mighty quick. It would be the joker in this game, all right! Well, why not make some? With what chemicals I've got left, couldn't I work up a half-pint? Bottled in glass flasks, I guess it would turn the trick on 'em!
  • The taller of the two officers stayed back in Franks apartment to finish up questioning them and taking their official statement, while the other went to do the initial work up of Ginas. Francesca had been doing a good job of remaining calm, but the longer she sat on Franks couch, the more she began to fidget, bouncing her legs up and down.
  • Presently they came to a steep hill. It was not steep enough to necessitate dismounting, but it rendered a rush inadvisable. They therefore worked up slowly, and, on gaining the top, got off to breathe and rest a while.
  • I didn't respond. It took me moments to make up my mind, but considerably longer to work up the courage to say it out loud. I couldn't go. I felt a responsibility to stay and help the human if I could.
  • Taking some keys from a strong coffer in Cacama's room, and bidding Roger take a torch from the wall, the queen led the way to the royal treasury. A massive door was first unlocked, and in a large room were seen ranged vessels of gold and silver; strong boxes containing gold necklaces, armlets, and other ornaments; while on lower shelves were bars of gold and silver, ready to be worked up.
  • "You must keep calm, Bessie, that's the first thing to think of. If you let yourself get excited and worked up you won't help Zara, and you'll only get into trouble yourself.
  • Very well, then, I said, "this shall be mine to arrange. The wind is in the east, my road lies westward: keep your boat, I hire it; let us work up the Forth all day; and land me at two o'clock to-morrow at the westmost we'll can have reached."
  • "Good morning," she sang out as he stepped out of the elevator at the top floor. Fred merely grunted and turned away. He'd been giving her the cold shoulder for weeks. Once, only once, he'd worked up a smile in return, and the warmth of her reply had scuttled his persona for days. He'd been unable to muster any grumpiness at all and his productivity had fallen way off. If he gave in to her now, it might ruin his whole plan.
  • Yes, a trifle faster; but I'll probably have to work up to a little better speed in order to get where I want to go before our goal begins to run away from us.
  • This small sander will enable you to work up to the skirting edge without damaging it.
  • The approaching riders having descended a decline were no longer visible, but they reappeared a few minutes later. In front, at a weary gallop and using his leather whip, rode an officer, disheveled and drenched, whose trousers had worked up to above his knees. Behind him, standing in the stirrups, trotted a Cossack. The officer, a very young lad with a broad rosy face and keen merry eyes, galloped up to Denisov and handed him a sodden envelope.
  • For two hours we listened to the most blatant boasting. He was a great driver; he had driven for M., the American millionaire; for the Chinese Ambassador to France; for Grand-Duke Alexis; for the Kaiser himself! We learned how he had been the trusted familiar of these celebrities, how on various occasions--all detailed at length--he had been treated by them as an equal; and he told us sundry sly, slanderous, and disgusting anecdotes of these worthies, his forefinger laid one side his nose. When we finally got him worked up to the point of going to get some excessively bad photographs, "I haf daken myself!" we began to have hopes. So we tentatively approached once more the subject of transportation.
  • It's a sou'easter, I'm almost certain, roared Dan in the girl's ear. "It will work up to a climax gradually, and then gradually go down, at this season of the year. Don't be afraid of the water. We can't sink, I believe; the only danger is that we might break up--and we won't do that."
  • Tamar relaxed a little; he was clearly working up to something. A stroke probably, but she'd rather have him like this. ‘You're right,' she said soothingly, ‘it's too hard, even if you'd been thinking about it, and I wasn't either, it doesn't mean anything, it wasn't your fault.'
  • I loved my brother tenderly, as I told your excellency, and I resolved not to send the money, but to take it to him myself. I possessed a thousand francs. I left five hundred with Assunta, my sister-in-law, and with the other five hundred I set off for Nimes. It was easy to do so, and as I had my boat and a lading to take in at sea, everything favored my project. But, after we had taken in our cargo, the wind became contrary, so that we were four or five days without being able to enter the Rhone. At last, however, we succeeded, and worked up to Arles. I left the boat between Bellegarde and Beaucaire, and took the road to Nimes.
  • Then let's start right now! cried Step Hen; "I'm all worked up with eagerness to block the little game that the old Rawson uncle is settin' up for poor Aleck. We said that we'd see the boy through, and we're going to do it, or drop in our tracks atryin'."
  • Oh, I remember now, Jerry replied. "She belongs to the Oriental Steamship Company. Old man Webb, of the Oriental Company, got all worked up about the possibilities of the Oriental trade right after the Spanish War. He had a lot of old bottoms running in the combined freight and passenger trade and not making expenses when the war came along, and the Government grabbed all his boats for transports to rush troops over to the Philippines. That was fine business for quite a while and the Oriental got out of the hole and made a lot of money besides. About that time Old Webb saw a vision of huge Oriental trade for the man who would go after it, and in his excitement he purchased the Narcissus. She carried horses down to the Philippines, and to China during the Boxer uprising; and when that business was over, and while old Webb was waiting for the expected boom in trade to the Orient, he got a lumber charter for her from Puget Sound to Australia.
  • By the time that the messenger returned with the glasses it had grown intensely dark: for to the natural obscurity of night there was added the further obscuration caused by the smoke with which the atmosphere was laden; while, to still further intensify the blackness, a heavy thunderstorm was working up against the wind, the combined result being a darkness in which it was literally impossible to see one's hand before one's face. Jack was at first inclined to anathematise the darkness; but when at length he was enabled to fully realise the intensity of it he felt much more disposed to bless it, for, having moved about half a dozen paces away from his post, and experienced some difficulty in finding his way back, he began to comfort himself with the reflection that the enemy, utterly strange to the country as they were, could do nothing until light enough should come to at least enable them to see where to put their feet.
  • Never mind, put in Gladys pacifically, "if we didn't find anything we didn't lose anything either, and I've worked up such an appetite from digging that I could eat an ox."
  • Amber rolled her eyes. "Hun, The David says just some wind and rain. Dont get all worked up about it." She looked at Barker, his face hidden behind the rag. "Honestly, he gets like a scared puppy every time we get a little weather. Hows your head?"
  • I worked upon these problems like a monkey. Sheila called over at about ten, on her way back from her Philosophy evening class. She and the others had been discussing animal rights; but the conversation had taken a vigorous turn towards feminism, and so Sheila was very worked up and elated. She described how shed taken on most of the class; made her views clearly and forcefully. Well, she didnt claim clarity for herself. She said she had tried to express herself well, and the instructor, Keith, had come to her aid. He had repeated her ideas and added to them. It was a discussion she was proud of.
  • "Shucks! that day will be a long time coming," said Jack, shaking his head in the negative, as if to emphasize his disbelief. "But do you know, I'm all worked up about that little tin box. There's something connected with it that Mr. Clausin hasn't told everybody. What could those papers have been; and why was he looking at them that night? Did the unknown robber come to the feed-store just on purpose to get hold of them? Was he especially interested in what that tin box held?"
  • So far we got, and no farther, in the transportation of supplies during the years I lived with the Folk. It never entered anybody's head to weave a basket out of willow-withes. Sometimes the men and women tied tough vines about the bundles of ferns and branches that they carried to the caves to sleep upon. Possibly in ten or twenty generations we might have worked up to the weaving of baskets. And of this, one thing is sure: if once we wove withes into baskets, the next and inevitable step would have been the weaving of cloth. Clothes would have followed, and with covering our nakedness would have come modesty.
  • Oh! look at it, would you? cried Larry, almost as much worked up as his smaller companion. "This time there's going to be something doing! I bet you Frank wants to just snatch a floating piece of wood off the water as he skims along, just like them Wild West riders do on horseback, when they throw their hats down. Why! Something must a-busted--they dropped splash on the lake; and look at the old biplane sitting right there like a great big gull! Ain't that too bad, though; I'm sorry for Frank and Andy!"
  • "I did not over-drink last night!" Goronwy said, conscious enough now to work up the energy to thwart any aspersions on his character.
  • The word described how I would have expected to react, but I didn't feel aggressive. I was exhausted, confused, and a little giddy. Maybe I was having a vivid dream, or an out-of-body experience. "Give me longer. I'm working up to it."
  • You must keep calm, Bessie, that's the first thing to think of. If you let yourself get excited and worked up you won't help Zara, and you'll only get into trouble yourself."
  • Six red roses. Romance on the welfare shed say, if she said anything. She hadnt spoken to him, not a word, for nearly a year after the fire, but nobody could keep that up all the time, so now she only spoke to him when necessary. Maybe she was softening. The response when he brought her breakfast in bed this morning had given him hope. He had been trying to work up the courage to do it for weeks. Perhaps there was no going back, but he just wanted to be part of the human race again.
  • It was time for dinner, and Walter hurried off arm in arm with Si, who was still somewhat worked up over what had happened. "Walter, don't you go for to imagine I thought you guilty," said the Yankee boy. "I know you are honest to the core."
  • The exports of Bulgaria are chiefly cereals, and the imports manufactured goods of all kinds. But by a system of high Protection and bonuses efforts are being made to establish manufacturing industries in the country. The oldest Bulgarian industry is weaving, which has existed from ancient times as a home industry. The wool of the country was worked up into cloths, carpets, braids, serges, etc., which were in request throughout the Ottoman Empire. The most important weaving centres are Pirdop, Panaguiouricht, Karlovo, Sopot, Koprivchtitza, Klissoura, Kalofer, Gabrovo, Trevna, Sliven, Kotel, and Samokov. Under Turkish rule, these towns supplied cloth to the Imperial army. Bulgarian cloths were then held in esteem, and there was a demand for them in Greece and in Asia Minor.
  • Later that night he worked up his courage to ask his father for the car. "Dad, either Friday or Saturday night it doesn't matter we can go either night."
  • Steadily working up through we passed the boatyard by bridge 7 at puttenham.
  • Yes, we'll certainly tell him, said Joe. "It might very well happen that Tom would prefer to begin at the top, especially if he should find that Long John had got ahead of him and was already working up from below."
  • "But there's data," Fred countered. "Tonality per person per session, I mean. How many times does Stanley breathe deep? How many times does he sigh? You could work up a map for each chat. It might come to nothing in the overall picture, but without all the data you never can tell."
  • He hesitated before the door to the library. Bessie was there, he knew, studiously working up her lessons. She must be nearly through with them, too, for she was always done before dinner, and dinner could not be many minutes away. As for his lessons, they were as yet untouched. The thought made him angry. It was bad enough to have one's sister--and two years younger at that--in the same grade, but to have her continually head and shoulders above him in scholarship was a most intolerable thing. Not that he was dull. No one knew better than himself that he was not dull. But somehow--he did not quite know how--his mind was on other things and he was usually unprepared.
  • Wright felt quite elated when he took his departure, for he had justified his contention that they had not been underbidden. Wright's business was to cut logs into lumber and sell the lumber. William Kent had looked after the logging end of the concern. The limits, the camps, and the drives were his field. What logs he did not sell he handed over to Wright and thought no more about, knowing that they would be worked up into everything from rough boards to matched flooring. Wright, then, having ascertained the reason of the throw down, accepted it philosophically as arising from circumstances beyond his control. But young Kent, when he received his manager's report, was not so philosophic.
  • Two more bright days of breeze succeeded and they were working up outside the fringe of islands, large and small, that dot the coast of Maine.
  • His name is Denis Faire,’ I said, and only then did I remember (although Whittle had not told me his surname). ‘Agnes,’ I exclaimed, ‘I wonder if thats the young man old Nathan Whittle was getting so worked up about!’
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