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Kelime, sayı veya tarih giriniz.
a
horse
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Seslendir:
Okunuşu: / hɔːs / Okunuş kuralları
Dil: İngilizce
Hecelenişi: horse
Ekler: hors·es
Türü: fiil, isim


Tanımı:


f. ata bindirmek;
at tedarik etmek;
kamçılamak;
sırtına binmek;
ata binmek;
A.b.d, argo. eşek şakası yapmak;
oynamak.

i. at, beygir;
aygır;
at familyasından hayvan;
süvari birliği;
kasa (jimnastik);
A.b.d, argo. öğrencilerin derslerde gizlice kullandıklan çeviri veya benzeri yardımcı şey;
A.b.d, argo. eroin.

horse için örnek cümleler:

(Üzerinde olduğunuz kelimenin anlamını görmek için 'CTRL' tuşuna basınız veya kelimeye tıklayınız.!)
  • "Go now, be free. Come in peace," the king said, turning. He mounted a horse and was gone in a blink, the bowmen stood for a moment more before departing as well.
  • "No. We are charged with the duty of protecting our people. We will not run. We do not have that option as leaders of men. We must fight and win at all cost," Tannis said as he turned away and went to find his horse.
  • The Imperial Mimes finally reached the last scene of their spectacle, the Death of the Emperor, or alternatively the Emperor Falling From His horse into a Moat and Getting Mauled by Lions. Not an easy thing to perform, but the Guild was up to the task. The lions were almost lifelike. On the other hand, Roseduck once more wondered if the strict rules of the mime performances shouldn't be loosened a bit, because a horse just cannot be properly played by a mime. Especially a horse being ridden. It always came out somewhat awkward. Roseduck watched with little interest as the emperor-mime awkwardly riding the horse-mime fell down and got jumped on by a few lion-mimes. And the spectacle was over. Now it was speech time.
  • "Calista, I—" He glanced at Hadrians arm around Calista. Tightening his mouth, he turned the horse around, galloping deep into the woods. The pounding of the rain, the squelching of his horses hooves overcame Calista.
  • Their horses were large and thick. They lifted their hooves high to clear the snow. Powerful muscles on their flanks bulged as they plowed a steady furrow. The noise of their trappings, clinking and clattering, had grown deafening.
  • Airk thanked the shepherd again and he and Jain rode on. Beyond the tower lay a path beaten into the grass by the soldiers and their horses on the way back and forth to the city. Jain smiled as they rode. "That was easier than I thought."
  • A very big smart traditional shire, a very showy horse, huge feet, a great big horse with a very good temperament.
  • As he handed the horses reins to the legionary he said, "My thanks, and see this horse is fed, watered and given fresh hay to sleep on."
  • Then suddenly the message from Arkin came and he sent his spell at the lead horse, ceasing its brain activity. The animal dropped. The other horses running close behind tripped, sending riders and horses all over the place and a gap began to open between them.
  • "Over that hill!" Belemeriath pointed to a slight rise two hundred yards away. The darkhounds were close behind, very close indeed. Fear drove the horses on. The darkhounds growled and yipped as they ran. Carameth tried to fire a few arrows, but he nearly lost his balance. Mias horse was wet with sweat and beginning to slow.
  • She spends all of her free time with her horse martini roaming the open moors.
  • Though Kalinies made it obvious he had no idea who she was, Jeralyle didn't get that same sense from Elryia. Glancing over at her he saw a look that frightened even him, a look of fire and hate. Her fingers eager and dancing at her sides. Every muscle in her legs twitched. Small bolts of electricity crept along her digits, strong enough to make Jeralyle's horse shift nervously. She was planning something catastrophic. Both Jeralyle and Kalinies knew itcould feel the air shifting around thembut the dark Wizard seemed prepared for it.
  • And so, the cart driver took Pyp on without a second thought. From Nualas tales, he knew the village of the seers was close to hers. As the horses raced through woods, Pyp snuggled in the warm hay and began creating a course of action, not a grand one which would save his home but one that would save only those most immediate necessities: his mother and himself and their friends. Now, he laid his hopes with Nuala, hoping against all logic that she would have some way of saving them.
  • "That thing" was the closed-off monument. Actually, as they approached the area, the monument had revealed itself to be a fountain, now shut off and in the process of being drained. The equestrian statue standing off-center in the pool, its horse reclining in the water and the heroically proportioned general leaning far off to one side with his sword extended, was being shored up with wood scaffolding. A section of the generals stone arm had already pulled apart from its own weight. "Kind of a strange way to build a statue, isnt it?" asked Jurtan.
  • "Unfortunately." Sallis grinned. "Perhaps Senator Olista will rectify his omission next time he wants to send a chaperone. Keep an eye out for a tall chestnut horse and tell me later if you've seen one leave."
  • The superintendent of police turned round at that moment with a scared look, said something to his coachman, and his horses increased their speed.
  • Holli seized upon the last statement, still unsure if taking the horses would give them a true advantage. "That is another point. What horse here can carry the cliff behemoth without collapsing after a minutes ride? Would it truly help us to leave a trail of exhausted animals?"
  • "Because those guys have horses, right? Are you sure you are feeding them well? I'm no expert, but they look awfully skinny. And that one seems to be a donkey."
  • The old distinction of velvet facings for regiments of horse was allowed to continue, with the bays retaining their buff facings.
  • Within the exhibition hall visitors will find a range of tradestands selling a variety of goods including saddlery, clothing and horse rugs.
  • Mappel did not answer. No one did. They simply watched as Dzeb strode up to the horsebacked riders that blocked the western pass of the road. The horses reared back and the surprised, cautious guards allowed them to do so. With silent, peaceful grace, as if walking through an empty park at sunrise, Dzeb stepped past the circle of riders. Nothing now stood between him and the ramp which passed over the ancient wall.
  • It was one of those March nights when winter seems to wish to resume its sway and scatters its last snows and storms with desperate fury. A relay of horses had been sent up the highroad to meet the German doctor from Moscow who was expected every moment, and men on horseback with lanterns were sent to the crossroads to guide him over the country road with its hollows and snow-covered pools of water.
  • Now the dust settled enough so that Roland could see the combatants fighting at close quarters. He admired the expert way they guided their mounts. The gigantic chargers seemed to step with the grace and precision of dancers. Knights and destriers were like the centaurs of Greek legend, rider and horse moving as a single creature.
  • Joff did not own a horse but he did know how to ride. Coursa had foreseen this and sent an extra horse with Jain and Airk. They all rode out of town together about an hour later. Airk had wanted to spend the night but Joff insisted that they get going right away.
  • On the morning of the twenty-fifth Pierre was leaving Mozhaysk. At the descent of the high steep hill, down which a winding road led out of the town past the cathedral on the right, where a service was being held and the bells were ringing, Pierre got out of his vehicle and proceeded on foot. Behind him a cavalry regiment was coming down the hill preceded by its singers. Coming up toward him was a train of carts carrying men who had been wounded in the engagement the day before. The peasant drivers, shouting and lashing their horses, kept crossing from side to side. The carts, in each of which three or four wounded soldiers were lying or sitting, jolted over the stones that had been thrown on the steep incline to make it something like a road. The wounded, bandaged with rags, with pale cheeks, compressed lips, and knitted brows, held on to the sides of the carts as they were jolted against one another. Almost all of them stared with naive, childlike curiosity at Pierre's white hat and green swallow-tail coat.
  • Paul wondered if it was perhaps a circus or some kind of travelling show, but on closer inspection the vehicles seemed just too scruffy. There was a Bedford lorry, with a horse box body into which the owner had added mismatched windows and a door with a panel of stained glass.
  • The Egyptian men who usually carried Nicolette's sedan chair had run away, she discovered. Amalric sent for a horse from the Queen's stable. When a page brought it, Nicolette climbed up behind him and they rode the short distance to the Saracen mansion he had claimed for himself when they took Damietta. Maurice said he would follow them on foot.
  • I personally have been out & about my usual haunts are lewin street / white horse alley / st annes road / stallard way.
  • Despite their loud chattering, each focused their attention on several Mongols arguing over the sale of a horse thirty meters away. One whipped out his wand and angrily fired in the air as soon as Williams head popped out. William walked around the hut to scan for danger. Given the dozen previous assassination attempts, William assumed he could not be too careful. He found the two other English guards alert, but apprehensive.
  • Alpatych entered the innyard at a quicker pace than usual and went straight to the shed where his horses and trap were. The coachman was asleep. He woke him up, told him to harness, and went into the passage. From the host's room came the sounds of a child crying, the despairing sobs of a woman, and the hoarse angry shouting of Ferapontov. The cook began running hither and thither in the passage like a frightened hen, just as Alpatych entered.
  • Did the horse and cart go over the edge, too? Man alive, he hoped not. Having grown up in southwestern Idaho with horses on his familys farm, he had a certain fondness for the four-legged animals, and wouldnt wish a horse any type of harm, no matter what its temperament was.
  • He flicked the horse with his whip, and we dashed away through the endless succession of sombre and deserted streets, which widened gradually, until we were flying across a broad balustraded bridge, with the murky river flowing sluggishly beneath us. Beyond lay another dull wilderness of bricks and mortar, its silence broken only by the heavy, regular footfall of the policeman, or the songs and shouts of some belated party of revellers. A dull wrack was drifting slowly across the sky, and a star or two twinkled dimly here and there through the rifts of the clouds. Holmes drove in silence, with his head sunk upon his breast, and the air of a man who is lost in thought, while I sat beside him, curious to learn what this new quest might be which seemed to tax his powers so sorely, and yet afraid to break in upon the current of his thoughts. We had driven several miles, and were beginning to get to the fringe of the belt of suburban villas, when he shook himself, shrugged his shoulders, and lit up his pipe with the air of a man who has satisfied himself that he is acting for the best.
  • Mias heart raced. She spurred her horse past Finnegaff and ran the old mare as hard as she could. She chanced a glance at the pursuing man dogs. They were quickly gaining.
  • Rist blinked and rushed back to the others as quickly as his horse would go, whispering harshly, "Into the forest everyone. Hurry!" As soon as he circled fully and they received word, he headed to the front of the line to lead the way.
  • "Get your gear! Line up here!" Swann swung his arm. As the riders walked their horses down the knoll, he got his crew armed and in orderthe archers in line to one side, the others in a knot by the fire.
  • He got off Poison and walked to Parkas, handing him the message. He tried not to walk back to his horse too quickly. When he got back on he saw Parkas looking concerned.
  • M has acquired dyslexia after she injured her brain falling from a horse at about 11 years.
  • They were off before sunrise. Finnegaff took a breakfast of motherberry while the others ate fruits and vegetables prepared for them by the all-vegetarian Centaurian royal cooks. Soon after sunrise, not three leagues from Grand Centauria did they encounter a Centaurian war camp. Thousands upon thousands of centaurs, manhorse along side mare, many dressed in chain mail or at least leather armor, trained for the battles that lay before them. Many conducted drills with shield and spear, shot arrows at targets, or jousted with dummies. Others performed what Mia later called horse karate, properly termed 'hoof dancing', an art of fighting with a staff while delivering kicks with any of their four feet.
  • The pubs are busy, heaving with after work drinkers, and I'm glad Mick has my money. The chip shop's safe. I get chips and eat them down by the river. It's pretty. The sun sets slowly, casting a pink glow over Oxford's domes and spires. horses and cows graze on Port Meadow. Swans glide along the river, noses in the air, unimpressed by life. Dog walkers and couples go by, giving me a wide berth, like I might jump up and mug them. Clearly, I spoil the ambience. You get used to it, ends up so you don't care that much anymore.
  • Formerly the stable, this room still has the original stone trough and horse stalls on which are written the winners of local point-to-points.
  • And it was almost in reach. Jurtan could smell the sea air. Less than an hour ago theyd even been visited by a flock of seabirds, virtually still damp, which had wheeled overhead briefly before screeching their way again west toward the ocean. If Max got a move on, they could probably reach Peridol while it was still day. The thought of not having to get up at the crack of dawn to climb on a horse ever again was almost unbearably appealing.
  • The guard finally dropped the drunk and decided to leave him there. So what if the next horse coming down the street would trample him. The guard began to walk away, muttering, "Dont drink so bloody much next time."
  • The square below the balconya grassy expanse between the side of the fort and the river wall, where Arangbar held noontime elephant fights and, on Tuesdays, executions by specially trained elephantshad already filled almost to capacity. Agras most prominent noblemen were there, as prudence required, and today there also were clusters of important visitors. Several Rajput chieftains from the northwest, astride prancing Arabian horses, passed regally through the river gate and assumed prominent positions. Then a path was cleared for a large embassy of Safavid Persian diplomats, each of whose palanquins was borne by four slaves in gleaming velvet liveries; next several desert Uzbek khans in leather headdress rode into the square; and finally three Portuguese Jesuits in black cassocks trooped through the river gate and moved imperiously to the front of the crowd.
  • We skirted the trees that grew close together on the bank and pushed our horses down a track that ran along the fields that lay on our side of the river. We rode as hard as we could, but the trail was a rough one and I didnt want to lose Glewdra to a hole. That would slow us down more than caution now. Then a shout came from up ahead.
  • "Im not happy with the accommodations for my horse at the inn," Eduard explained. "You have a good stable. I was wondering if I could put the horse up here. It will only be a few days and I will pay you."
  • Leen stopped. Something seemed to attract her from the left. She squinted over and cocked her ear, but even as she did she realized that whatever had caught her interest wasnt something she had heard or seen. Whatever it had been, it was gone now. There was nothing remarkable on that side of the street at all. A few street vendors, a blacksmith shop, and the usual mix of passersby. A couple of grungy neer-do-well travelers were leading a pack horse; as early in the day as it was, the lot of them already had at least two sheets to the wind, judging by the glazed expression of the young one in the lead, and the way he appeared to be simultaneously sniffing the air and listening to it. Just then, the pair of them bent right and shouldered their way lengthwise across the traffic, dragging the reluctant horse behind them. As they crossed ahead of Leen on their way into a narrow side street, the eye of the man holding the horses bridle swung across her from beneath the shady depths of a battered slouch hat. For an instant, they locked glances; then he was gone.
  • At our blockhouse he ate sparingly as though accustomed to short rations by a long siege of starvation, but drank enough for two or three menalways demanding beer, and looking on water as little more than poison, whether applied internally or without. He slept and lay on his bedroll in the stable, rarely rising except for calls of nature, content with the company of horses and ponies.
  • It was not what he had hoped for; he hated to waste food, and a deer that size would be too much for him to eat alone. Sadly, it would have to do; he had not the luxury of waiting any longer. With his gaze sharpened and hand wrapped around the blowgun, he pulled it up to his mouth and drew a breath, pressing his lips to the tube. He huffed and the dart was sent spiraling outward, sticking firmly into the meat between the neck and front leg of the beast. The deer blinked in surprise, running the other way as Graham made chase but not fast enough to catch it. He knew that the poison would only need a few minutes to take effect. Grahamas found the fawn a few yards ahead, slumped on the side of the roadno longer breathing. As Graham passed, he leaned down as far as he could from the top of the horse and grabbed the creature's hind leg, pulling it up and draping it over the back of his mount. Keeping one hand on it, he turned from the road and into the valley, at least a safe distance so that his fire could not be seen.
  • "RIDE!" Finnegaff cried. They brought the horses to a full run. Several more arrows were fired at them, but missed. Soon they were out of bow range.
  • "They'd help in the canyons, I can't argue that, but not in the desert. I can get enough water for us, but not for three horses as well. We'd have to bring a great supply of water for them and that would weigh them down. No, we'll be better off on foot."
  • It was St. Natalia's day and the name day of two of the Rostovs--the mother and the youngest daughter--both named Nataly. Ever since the morning, carriages with six horses had been coming and going continually, bringing visitors to the Countess Rostova's big house on the Povarskaya, so well known to all Moscow. The countess herself and her handsome eldest daughter were in the drawing-room with the visitors who came to congratulate, and who constantly succeeded one another in relays.
  • Samsun raised, seemingly pulled away from his own thoughts, "Night Jer," he replied and the Mage moved to the edge of the forest for the night. Sam stood as well, "I will watch tonight," he informed El as he approached his horse.
  • Despite this destitution, the soldiers and officers went on living just as usual. Despite their pale swollen faces and tattered uniforms, the hussars formed line for roll call, kept things in order, groomed their horses, polished their arms, brought in straw from the thatched roofs in place of fodder, and sat down to dine round the caldrons from which they rose up hungry, joking about their nasty food and their hunger. As usual, in their spare time, they lit bonfires, steamed themselves before them naked; smoked, picked out and baked sprouting rotten potatoes, told and listened to stories of Potemkin's and Suvorov's campaigns, or to legends of Alesha the Sly, or the priest's laborer Mikolka.
  • Off the port side and up ahead was a patroller boat. From along a riverside towpath, a team of four horses and two drivers towed the boat slowly forward against the current.
  • Needless to say, Piedmonts campus rendered my parents and me speechless. The moment we stepped onto its soil I knew Piedmont was the college for me. Yeah, Im sure that the Trojan horse also looked real pretty as it rolled into enemy gates. Thats part of the reason why I never liked gift-wrapping. The moron that invented the colorful covering must have been giving a real shitty gift and wanted to disguise the contents.
  • Rommus reached into a pocket when he reached the bottom of the stairs. "Vohl, take these coins and purchase another horse. Go get the horses we left tied at the pile of stones. Take water with you. I don't want them to suffer and die out there. Bring them back here and meet us at this temple at sunset. Hurry."
  • Crimson sunset bathed the woods around them in streaks of pink through the ebon trees. Although the day had been warm enough to leave a glimmer of water on the ice covered road, temperatures began descending with the sun. The horses breathed feathers of white steam into the half light.
  • A bold, honest genuine and talented horse who is a great confidence giver.
  • Max vaulted over the thrashing horse before it could crush him against the wall and rolled upward out of the pit. Not pausing, he pushed out of the roll and sprang up the side of the gully. Just above of him sticking over the edge an arrow was being slapped into a bow. Max snatched at an exposed root just below the lip, pulled himself closer, grabbed the bow with his other hand, then let go of his grip on the root. As he fell backward he pushed off with his feet and yanked. With a crazed howl a man appeared in the air above Max, still holding his bow. The man twisted over Max and followed his bow head-first into the pit.
  • Suddenly, away on our left I saw a faint flickering blue flame. The driver saw it at the same moment. She at once checked the horses, and, jumping to the ground, disappeared into the darkness. I did not know what to do, the less as the howling of the wolves grew closer. But while I wondered, the driver suddenly appeared again, and without a word took her seat, and we resumed our journey. I think I must have fallen asleep and kept dreaming of the incident, for it seemed to be repeated endlessly, and now looking back, it is like a sort of awful nightstallion. Once the flame appeared so near the road, that even in the darkness around us I could watch the driver's motions. She went rapidly to where the blue flame arose, it must have been very faint, for it did not seem to illumine the place around it at all, and gathering a few stones, formed them into some device.
  • Legon nodded at Arkin and closed his eyes. After a few hours passed, Arkin brought the horses out of the deep sleep he had placed them in so they would not make noise. They packed their belongings and began to make their way out through the thick brush. The light from Legons magic was just bright enough to dim any light that could have made its way into their hideout, so Keither wasnt sure what time of day it was. As they moved out of the thicker parts of the trees and back on the road, he was blinded by dazzling light. He held his arm up, blocking the sun from eyes that did not seem to want to adjust.
  • "This, friend dragon, is Miagaff, Romessee, Zimmictreckt and Karthich." The Mantids had slowed their twittering, yet sat upon their horse huddled together.
  • As if in response to this, Legon heard the sound of horses trotting along in the distance. Three men wearing wooden armor approached them. They didnt look unkind in the least bit, and after their past experiences, Legon was expecting a bit more of a hostile welcome.
  • "When I was night-guard on caravans, predators sometimes came after horses or waybeasts," Holder explained further. "Usually I managed to frighten them away instead of killing any."
  • Prince Bagration screwed up his eyes, looked round, and, seeing the cause of the confusion, turned away with indifference, as if to say, "Is it worth while noticing trifles?" He reined in his horse with the case of a skillful rider and, slightly bending over, disengaged his saber which had caught in his cloak. It was an old-fashioned saber of a kind no longer in general use. Prince Andrew remembered the story of Suvorov giving his saber to Bagration in Italy, and the recollection was particularly pleasant at that moment. They had reached the battery at which Prince Andrew had been when he examined the battlefield.
  • The Bedford horse box fired up with a blast of black smoke from the exhaust and manoeuvred till it was nose to nose with the coach.
  • Mirra called the grey horse and followed at a distance, keeping the Demon Lord just barely in sight. The demon steed gave off a red glow that lighted the way like a beacon, and the troops straggled after them, some carrying torches, jingling with newfound wealth that would only burden them on the hard march ahead. The trolls, goblins and rock howlers carried more practical booty; smoked meat and tasty supplies from the keep's stores, much of which had already found its way into their copious stomachs. The unburdened dark creatures brought up the rear, gorged with human meat and blood. The tunnel curved upwards after a few minutes of travel, and a cold wind blew down it. Mirra shivered, her eyes burning with unshed tears, both for the demon's victims, and Bane.
  • "Their uniforms," Carameth said. They walked their horses from the grove of trees. "They're lower ranking soldiers. Otherwise they wouldn't be so drunk."
  • Tachyon chimed once more and gave an odd body shiver. He tilted scarily forwardthen rocketed out towards the beach, accelerating hugely. Maggie was damn glad she had such a tight grip on the reins: her back slammed forcefully against the hump at the base of Tachyons fan as she shot just over the top of a breaking wave. And then, in a smooth arc to infinity, the kings sea horse whooooooshed! upward, taking her with him. The Pacific Ocean shrank frightfully away beneath her, the wind a deafening roar in her ears, her hair plastered to her skull. She thought her head would soon be ripped clean from her shoulders, but the force of the oncoming air suddenly and simply ceased.
  • If there was one rule in this business, it was never to throw out a usable piece. Fradi directed Lowell to the site of the most urgent errand, and then, their business there complete, onward toward home. A horse was already in the courtyard; apparently this was Fradis day for consultation. The visitor was already installed in the library. Fradi shut the double door behind him as he entered. "Welcome, my lord," said Fradi. "I trust you find the brandy to your liking?"
  • The horses are cut into the grassy top soil, which is then removed to expose the chalk underneath.
  • "No," Billy replied, unusually frustrated, gesturing to several Mongols who seemed to enjoy the task of seeing just how much pain this guy could endure before dying. "He's a lot tougher than I am. They now want to finish him using four horses to tear off his limbs."
  • They bickered as they mounted their horses and raced back down the road towards the Wendak, their heavy packs slapping against the poor horseshaunches. I didnt dare to breathe until they were out of sight and the cracking noise of the horses hooves disappeared.
  • "Men protested that we could capture the hedge witch and head back to Riverford. I pointed out that first, it is extremely difficult to capture and hold a hedge witch, we had no way to combat the magic she could wield and second, Allivan knights had horses and could easily run us down long before we reached the safety of the castle."
  • Holli dismounted and met Ryson on foot. She requested a full scout of the perimeter surrounding the mountain's base. If something hid on the other side, she would know of it before they ventured forward. To the others, she directed them to bring their horses to a cluster of trees. Each rider dismounted and tethered their animal to a branch or tree trunk and waited patiently as Holli quietly scanned the area. Her darting eyes covered every direction in an instant. With equal speed, she decided upon her strategy.
  • "And even the miserable lives we lead are not allowed to reach their natural span. For myself I do not grumble, for I am one of the lucky ones. I am twelve years old and have had over four hundred children. Such is the natural life of a pig. But no animal escapes the cruel knife in the end. You young porkers who are sitting in front of me, every one of you will scream your lives out at the block within a year. To that horror we all must come-cows, pigs, hens, sheep, everyone. Even the horses and the dogs have no better fate. You, Boxer, the very day that those great muscles of yours lose their power, Jones will sell you to the knacker, who will cut your throat and boil you down for the foxhounds. As for the dogs, when they grow old and toothless, Jones ties a brick round their necks and drowns them in the nearest pond.
  • We are like a herd of wild horses, he thought. Where the leader goes all the others must follow, even if it be over the edge of a cliff.
  • Finally, they came to a stand of trees, at the foot of the villas hill, where a pair of horses, panicky because of the storm, were tied. Claudius and Calista swung onto them, and Hadrian clambered on behind Calista.
  • He did... with me following. We went down the stairs, sounding like a herd of horses, and just when we got to the foot of them the lights snapped on and a guy said: "Hold it!"
  • Jain and Airk mounted their horses and followed the cousins back through the forest to Coursas cottage. Dusk was gathering when they arrived, and Jain smiled at the inviting light from the windows. The breeze shifted and she caught a whiff of Coursas cooking. Her stomach rumbled.
  • "Footprints. A few of them," he said as he jumped off of his horse and knelt on the ground to look at them closer. Back and forth his gaze turned, trying to gauge exactly how many there were and where they headed. Before him the road split, the left side turned south and the right went wide to the west. Graham surveyed one last time at the footprints: they disappeared far off into the horizon, where the sun teetered.
  • Starrelocke thought about it for a second, then brightened. "I see this meaning! How clever!" She giggled. "Let this be a day to prim hair, me ladies!" Starrelocke spun on a dime and off they went, Starrelocke babbling without pause as she led Mia and Romessee and their horses noisily across the drawbridge.
  • When they came out onto the beaten highroad--polished by sleigh runners and cut up by rough-shod hoofs, the marks of which were visible in the moonlight--the horses began to tug at the reins of their own accord and increased their pace. The near side horse, arching his head and breaking into a short canter, tugged at his traces. The shaft horse swayed from side to side, moving his ears as if asking: "Isn't it time to begin now?" In front, already far ahead the deep bell of the sleigh ringing farther and farther off, the black horses driven by Zakhar could be clearly seen against the white snow. From that sleigh one could hear the shouts, laughter, and voices of the mummers.
  • "Wow, I never knew an oagar could run as fast as horses and ponies," George said to his friend. Before they had stopped, Lout was leading the pack.
  • Dimarico shook his head, saying, "Well, I'll tell you one thing, we can't use these lousy slow oxcarts that look ready to break down and hardly go two miles an hour. We need to have draft horses and the best wagons we can find."
  • The horse racing tipsters selections can be relayed by email... of all the horse racing tipsters selections can be relayed by email... of all the horse racing tipsters we relay, although.. .
  • At the tangy scent of blood and charred flesh, Aidens horse began to crow hop and dance beneath him. When they came across the first blackened human skeleton the stallion squealed and bucked until he was forced to dismount or be thrown. The moment his feet touched the scorched earth, the beast reared, tore its reins from his hand, and ran off with its tail up in the air. Thats what he got for bringing a fresh, untried warhorse that had undergone very little training.
  • They dodged the people on the street and waited for horses to pass as they made their way to the shop. The man inside looked to be a friendly fellow, and greeted them right away.
  • Suddenly from behind they heard loud thunder of stone and rumble of boulders. Hutch drove his horse by Hamilcar and as he rounded the corner a huge cloud of dust and debris engulfed him.They were trapped. Hamilcar passed out and fell off his horse.
  • The only road in sight disappeared around the hills and into the woods. There were no signposts, boot marks, or horse tracks, let alone princes.
  • The owl took flight immediately, searching for anything out of the ordinary, any disturbances, or any other people on the move in the area. In less than thirty minutes, the owl had located the horse and cart. The frightened horse was finally apprehended when, exhausted, it had stopped to rest, its head drooping low to the ground. All Kern had to do was grab the reins. The tired horse even whinnied its appreciation to its new owners.
  • But death was getting close. I need water. His horse wasnt doing much better. He could almost hear it panting. He didnt care though. If the horse died, he would beat it with a stick. He needed to find this bloody archer.
  • In the darkness, it seemed as though a gloomy unseen river was flowing always in one direction, humming with whispers and talk and the sound of hoofs and wheels. Amid the general rumble, the groans and voices of the wounded were more distinctly heard than any other sound in the darkness of the night. The gloom that enveloped the army was filled with their groans, which seemed to melt into one with the darkness of the night. After a while the moving mass became agitated, someone rode past on a white horse followed by his suite, and said something in passing: "What did he say? Where to, now? Halt, is it? Did he thank us?" came eager questions from all sides. The whole moving mass began pressing closer together and a report spread that they were ordered to halt: evidently those in front had halted. All remained where they were in the middle of the muddy road.
  • "The man was pleasant enough to me," replied the driver. A dark-blue gaze regarded their horses sardonically. "And the horse he's riding now will put those manky things into the ground in no time."
  • Roland's heartbeat quickened, but he tried to sound casual. "The quiet way, that is the Panther's way, is it not? I still remember when you came as a horse groom to Damietta. I know only one other man of exalted rank who goes as freely among the people as you do - King Louis. Only he does not go in disguise."
  • To this centre, Wellington added one of Chasse's brigades taken from the right wing, and one of Wincke's brigades taken from the left wing, plus Clinton's division. To his English, to the regiments of Halkett, to the brigades of Mitchell, to the guards of Maitland, he gave as reinforcements and aids, the infantry of Brunswick, Nassau's contingent, Kielmansegg's Hanoverians, and Ompteda's Germans. This placed twenty-six battalions under his hand. The right wing, as Charras says, was thrown back on the centre. An enormous battery was masked by sacks of earth at the spot where there now stands what is called the "Museum of Waterloo." Besides this, Wellington had, behind a rise in the ground, Somerset's Dragoon Guards, fourteen hundred horse strong. It was the remaining half of the justly celebrated English cavalry. Ponsonby destroyed, Somerset remained.
  • Clearly, it still rankled that the wrong horse had been backed in 1938.
  • Approaching the front of the frozen horde, she passed Egyptian, Babylonian, and Assyrian charioteers with their horses stopped in mid-gallop and their rigid whips locked in the air above them. There was even a crowd of Neanderthal cave men in mangy furs, hefting stone axes and clubs. Alix turned and looked at the frigid valley, stunned by this army of ghostly warriors.
  • We made our way downstairs as quietly as possible, and out into the bright morning sunshine. In the road stood our horse and trap, with the half-clad stable-boy waiting at the head. We both sprang in, and away we dashed down the London Road. A few country carts were stirring, bearing in vegetables to the metropolis, but the lines of villas on either side were as silent and lifeless as some city in a dream.
  • The coach with six horses was waiting at the porch. It was an autumn night, so dark that the coachman could not see the carriage pole. Servants with lanterns were bustling about in the porch. The immense house was brilliant with lights shining through its lofty windows. The domestic serfs were crowding in the hall, waiting to bid good-by to the young prince. The members of the household were all gathered in the reception hall: Michael Ivanovich, Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary, and the little princess. Prince Andrew had been called to his father's study as the latter wished to say good-by to him alone. All were waiting for them to come out.
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