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advantage
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Seslendir:
Okunuşu: / əd’vɑːntɪdʒ / Okunuş kuralları
Dil: İngilizce


Tanımı:

avantaj;
çıkar;
fayda;
intifa;
istifade;
iyilik;
kazanç;
menfaat;
üstünlük;
yarar

advantage için örnek cümleler:

(Üzerinde olduğunuz kelimenin anlamını görmek için 'CTRL' tuşuna basınız veya kelimeye tıklayınız.!)
  • I bought it myself of La Salle for one hundred and fifty. He killed it, and sold it to me. I guess I can sell to good advantage.
  • At half-past eight in the evening he supped with his sister, Madame Magloire standing behind them and serving them at table. Nothing could be more frugal than this repast. If, however, the Bishop had one of his cures to supper, Madame Magloire took advantage of the opportunity to serve Monseigneur with some excellent fish from the lake, or with some fine game from the mountains. Every cure furnished the pretext for a good meal: the Bishop did not interfere. With that exception, his ordinary diet consisted only of vegetables boiled in water, and oil soup. Thus it was said in the town, when the Bishop does not indulge in the cheer of a cure, he indulges in the cheer of a trappist.
  • Prince Andrew without joining in the conversation watched every movement of Speranski's: this man, not long since an insignificant divinity student, who now, Bolkonski thought, held in his hands--those plump white hands--the fate of Russia. Prince Andrew was struck by the extraordinarily disdainful composure with which Speranski answered the old man. He appeared to address condescending words to him from an immeasurable height. When the old man began to speak too loud, Speranski smiled and said he could not judge of the advantage or disadvantage of what pleased the sovereign.
  • As it is, he has had reasons for delaying, more than one. First, his desire to make the journey without being observed; and to guard against this, he has been zig zagging a good deal, to take advantage of such cover as was offered by the palm groves and scattered copses of quebracho.
  • I said that would not do at all, Saxe, to have some one watching our movements, and taking advantage of our being away to profit by them. Still, I feel pretty safe so far, and to-morrow we will climb to the mouth of that gully and stop about it, even if we do not go up.
  • At the time she entered the pensionat she was barely twenty years of age--she was now consequently just thirty--a handsome girl, although somewhat thin and pale, from the hard life and harder living she had gone through; and she now determined more than ever to take advantage of her looks and chances, literally to husband her resources. To endeavour in fact by a wealthy marriage--she had read and was told that eligible partis were much sooner picked up on the continent than in the more calculating Britain--to rid herself for ever of her working life, and be above the danger of want, which, poor intriguante, she had already gone through, and the necessity for drudgery.
  • Mareth watched the battle rage through the now thinning fog, the shaman too busy with the assault to worry about keeping up the blind. The defenders had been well prepared indeed but thanks to the Lord General's spy he knew the tide would turn soon. The devices of destruction being employed were limited and soon the advantage would swing again to the legions.
  • "But the worst of it, gentlemen--I am giving Kuragin away to you--is that that man suffers, and this Don Juan, wicked fellow, is taking advantage of it!"
  • Fourth, the discursive advantage is now held by the democrats. This means that the ideas that look strange in respect to the Alevi and Kurdish issues now will be the dominant views in the future.
  • To refuse to fill the order from the bin indicated would amount to resigning his position, yet he was determined not to take advantage of any customer. For a moment he hesitated. Then he weighed the tea out of the thirty-five cent bin, but he gave the customer a pound and seven ounces.
  • Natasha, who had borne the first period of separation from her betrothed lightly and even cheerfully, now grew more agitated and impatient every day. The thought that her best days, which she would have employed in loving him, were being vainly wasted, with no advantage to anyone, tormented her incessantly. His letters for the most part irritated her. It hurt her to think that while she lived only in the thought of him, he was living a real life, seeing new places and new people that interested him. The more interesting his letters were the more vexed she felt. Her letters to him, far from giving her any comfort, seemed to her a wearisome and artificial obligation. She could not write, because she could not conceive the possibility of expressing sincerely in a letter even a thousandth part of what she expressed by voice, smile, and glance. She wrote to him formal, monotonous, and dry letters, to which she attached no importance herself, and in the rough copies of which the countess corrected her mistakes in spelling.
  • Perk was chuckling to himself at a great rate and could not keep from taking advantage of the invitation Jack had really extended to say:
  • The snow in the trail had been trodden very hard, and the pursuers had thus a great advantage over the pursued. They pushed on, indeed, at a round trot, two hundred hoofs beating alternately on the dull pavement of the snow, and the jingle of weapons and the snorting of horses raising a warlike noise along the arches of the silent wood.
  • "Of course I was there. Wouldnt have missed this chance for the world. But…." Sarah frowns and starts to try to explain. "I still dont understand. Why file this suit in the first place? There's obviously no basis in fact, so what's the motivation? Is it a publicity stunt, created specifically for the thirtieth Anniversary of AIDS? Is there some hidden political agenda that hasnt surfaced somehow? Or is this guy just some greedy lawyer taking advantage of a few poor families, making them grieve all over again, trying to pocket a huge commission? I cant figure it out."
  • "My father watches," warns Edmund. "Oh, sir, fly this place!—intelligence is given where you are hid! You have now the good advantage of the night!
  • As if by magic, a victorious army was transformed into a flying mob. The Spaniards and Tlascalans took instant advantage of the change. Fatigue and thirst, wounds and exhaustion were forgotten. With shouts of triumph, and vengeance, they broke their ranks and followed hotly upon the fugitives. These, impeded by their very numbers, and half mad with panic, offered no resistance whatever. Great numbers were overtaken and slain and, when the Spaniards abandoned the pursuit at the summons of their leader's trumpet, and assembled round him, the field was covered with the bodies of their fallen foes.
  • Do not for a moment imagine that there was any attempt on the part of this truly happy family to take any advantage of the tender susceptibilities of the "Boy Spy." They knew absolutely nothing of my past record.
  • Gahan was engaged with a fellow who appeared to have been selected to account for him only, since he rode straight for him and sought to cut him down without giving the slightest heed to several who slashed at him as he passed them. The Gatholian, practiced in the art of combating a mounted warrior from the ground, sought to reach the left side of the fellow's thoat a little to the rider's rear, the only position in which he would have any advantage over his antagonist, or rather the position that would most greatly reduce the advantage of the mounted man, and, similarly, the Manatorian strove to thwart his design. And so the guardsman wheeled and turned his vicious, angry mount while Gahan leaped in and out in an effort to reach the coveted vantage point, but always seeking some other opening in his foe's defense.
  • "Then, with all respect, I say that such men may be found; but they would be unworthy pardon, much less reward. May it please your Highness, a Buccaneer is, to my mind, only one who takes advantage of troubled times to secure unto himself the most power and the most property that he can.
  • For myself I had plenty to do, and I never found the time heavy on my hands. In every country it has been my custom to try to learn the language. For this reason I always look round for some lady who will be kind enough to teach it to me, and then we practise it together. This is the most interesting way of picking it up, and before I was thirty I could speak nearly every tongue in Europe; but it must be confessed that what you learn is not of much use for the ordinary purposes of life. My business, for example, has usually been with soldiers and peasants, and what advantage is it to be able to say to them that I love only them, and that I will come back when the wars are over?
  • Elvallon constantly reminded him that others who had the Gift or, worse, control over sorcery, could counter him, though even he admitted that anyone able to speed up their movement through time held a pretty good advantage.
  • Diabolical anger showed upon the face of Captain Jack as he grappled with the young Englishman. The pirate chief held the advantage when the two came together, for he had the impetus of his advance behind him, while Jack was off his balance when they grappled. Therefore Captain Jack was uppermost when they struck the deck.
  • Which just went to prove his point. His sister did need someone to keep on eye on her. Somebody who wasnt out to take advantage had to be concerned for her well-being here in the big city where she was so obviously out of her depth. She might have rejected him now but shed certainly thank him later. He creaked to his feet and wobbled in after her through the door.
  • We will race you, shouted Don and Billykins together, and, dropping the handle of the bath chair, they set off at full tear, while Sylvia came helter-skelter after them, her long legs helping not a little in overhauling the small boys, who had a distinct advantage by getting away so smartly at the first.
  • Knowing that the city gates were right now being closed and bolted, trapping both Wherrys army and all the inhabitants of the city in Rowes streets, Roan quickly pulled free his blade and rolled off his horse. Something exploded to his right, most assuredly the work of the wizards, and he took advantage of the surprise and panic to quickly thrust his knife into the side of the nearest Wherrite soldier. Grabbing the dying mans sword, he pushed his way into the surrounding crowd.
  • It contained a tourist agency's circular cheque for a moderate sum, payable by coupons at any of the company's offices in England and Canada, and Foster saw the advantage of this, because, as the offices were numerous, one could not tell where the coupons would be cashed. Then he found a letter, which he thought bore out his conclusions, although, on the surface, it did not tell him much. It stated that Jackson's business had been satisfactorily transacted in Berlin, but the Hamburg matter had not been arranged yet. Lascelles had had some difficulties in Paris, but expected to negotiate a sale.
  • Tom found Lizzie alone this time, and you may be certain he took advantage of the opportunity. You see the case had nearly been concluded before, and was well understood between the pair, so it did not require all that serious preparation, and Quintus Curtian resolve before dashing into the yawning gulf. Tom plunged into it at once. Lizzie's fresh little face, with its melting violet eyes, and the pretty embarrassment which she displayed as she received him in her little conservatory, into which he walked at once to find her on hearing Pringle was out, made him fear nothing and all confident.
  • He seemed to be right, for the defenders passed a cruel night; but morning dawned, and the enemy had not gained a single advantage more than before.
  • Rostov's deferential tone seemed to indicate that though he would consider himself happy to be acquainted with her, he did not wish to take advantage of her misfortunes to intrude upon her.
  • I thank you for the privileges of the island which you have offered me, said Nathaniel, putting on his hat, "and I shall certainly take advantage of your kindness for a few hours, as I want very much to witness one of your ceremonies which I understand is to take place to-day. Then, if I have discovered nothing, I shall return to my ship."
  • Now listen to the crowd roar! You know that must mean. The Heavyweight Champion of the World is here and there he is! Doing his trademark poses while his bodyguard Crowd Control stands to his left. Man, the crowd is amped tonight! Thank you fans all around for coming out and tuning in to this weeks Cutting Edge. The Stud, accompanied by big Double C, makes his way to the ring. Wait, hold up, I was just informed that this will be a no DQ match. Looks like the advantage just swung tremulously toward KaBoom. This is now his type of match.
  • Hitherto they had not suffered much from cold, but that night, as they lay in their tents with the small fires which their limited supply of fuel allowed them to keep up, they were nearly frozen. Andrew several times remembering the advantage he had before gained from taking exercise, got up and ran about to warm himself. Those who followed his example awoke refreshed and fit for work, whereas those who had remained quiet all the night, found their limbs stiff and their feet and hands frozen, and it was not till after, with the help of their companions, they had moved about and undergone great pain, that they were able to proceed. Some, indeed, had suffered so much, that they entreated to be left to die rather than undergo the hardships they would have to endure. Andrew urged them to arouse themselves.
  • Both basketball teams entered the gym to start their warm-ups. After missing a three-point shot, Carter glanced over at the other side to scope out the competition. Compared to his team, the Millbrook guys looked scrawny and frail. They were taking shots as well, and it seemed like they made every single one. Thanks to the supplement, Carters team had the advantage in muscle, but it still looked like it would be an extremely close game.
  • A beautiful settingLeeAnn was right. Had he a family and the necessary bucks, what a vacation they could have! But no advantage in churning-up that again.
  • "I am at the same time a privilege and responsibility. I am here to make sure that you fulfill your responsibilities and that you take full advantage of your privileges."
  • It soon came. The wolf was lean and desperate, and with a terrific growl he bounded forward, but was met by the brave boy, who sprang aside as he came, and before the monster could recover his leap, Edward had dealt him several deep and deadly blows. Following up his advantage he sprang at the wolf with his knife, plunging it again and again in his side. The brute feeling he was being conquered, with a mighty effort turned on Edward with jaws extended, and would have done him harm had not Anne sprung forward with the circular metallic relic they had found at the fort, and placed it before her brother. This drew the attention of the enraged wolf on her; but before he could spring, Edward had felled him a second time to the ground, where he soon dispatched him.
  • But here the simplification ended, and a complication intruded itself. It was not so long ago that she had sat under the stone-pine with Archie, and seen his face glow in the darkness as he drew on his cigarette. In point of attractiveness there was naturally no comparison between her cousin and this amiable middle-aged man, but owing to the impossibility of the most limited polyandry it was clearly no use to think of marrying them both, and all that was left was to choose between them, supposing, as she most sincerely did, that it was, or soon would be, for her to choose. Certainly she was not in love with Archie, if she took as an example of that the ridiculous symptoms exhibited by Daisy Hollinger, who by some strange freak was in love with Lord Harlow. Helena had behaved very wisely over that, for she had instantly seen the advantage of becoming great friends, in her sense of the word, with poor Daisy, who poured out to her a farrago of amorous imbecility, and she was sure that she wasnot in love with Archie like that. Anything so insane seemed incomprehensible to her (and was).
  • Anthony smiled unexpectedly, so that Betty, who happened to be glancing toward him at the moment, was vexed over his ability to amuse himself. He had only just guessed why Dr. Barton found it necessary to regard Miss Dyer so sternly. Anthony felt that he would like to make friends with this young men. He was evidently somewhat narrow and puritanical, but already had offered to assist him with any of his studies should he need help. And Anthony meant to take advantage of his offer and to interest him if he could; for Dr. Barton was just the kind of a friend he would like to know intimately in these early days of his struggle.
  • Dale looked doubtful, but he said nothing--only stood watching while Melchior crept right into the narrowest part and began to ascend, taking advantage of every crack and prominence, rising higher and higher without a moment's hesitation, though so narrow was their standing-place, that unless Dale and Saxe could stop him in case of a slip, the unfortunate man would glance off and shoot into space.
  • The sand giants posed no threat to him or his goblins. They focused solely upon the dwarves. It was like having an independent army of great strength at his own disposal, and the serp used such an advantage with great skill.
  • Under a more liberal policy new lines will be opened, and the various portions of the Southern States become accessible. During the war two railways were constructed under the auspices of the Rebel Government, that will prove of great advantage in coming years. These are the lines from Meridian, Mississippi, to Selma, Alabama, and from Danville, Virginia, to Greensborough, North Carolina. A glance at a railway map of the Southern States will show their importance.
  • The sounds of women and children screaming from in the town could be heard echoing down the street, but the remaining militia nearby were locked in battle with another group of soldiers that had rushed them while Aiden and the others were occupied. Colt swapped out his greatsword for the longbow, and began to string it, while Sayana sheathed her body in a shimmering layer of force armour, her tattoos glowing softly as she took advantage of this brief lull to enact several protective magicks.
  • Harvey was in a glow with the exercise, and this last cut warmed him thoroughly. Now he was a singularly smart boy, the son of a very clever man and a very sensitive woman, with a fine resolute temper that systematic spoiling had nearly turned to mulish obstinacy. He looked at the other men, and saw that even Dan did not smile. It was evidently all in the day's work, though it hurt abominably; so he swallowed the hint with a gulp and a gasp and a grin. The same smartness that led him to take such advantage of his mother made him very sure that no one on the boat, except, maybe, Penn, would stand the least nonsense. One learns a great deal from a mere tone.
  • But Baptista consoles poor Litio. "Well, go with me and be not so discomfited! Proceed in practise with my younger daughter; shes apt to learning, and thankful for good turns!" Suddenly, Hortensio feels much betterhe can even take advantage of the instrument brought by a rival.
  • The goblin horde had no such harmony. Though their strength rested in numbers, they could never boast of being a truly cohesive unit. They moved in waves of bedlam and used chaos and turmoil to confuse and demoralize their victims. On this day, they faced dwarves and dwarves laugh at such attempts. The goblins could not intimidate this foe through fear, and though their ranged weapons might have given them an edge against the slow moving dwarves, they lacked the proper discipline to use that advantage effectively. Eventually, the dwarves would fight through any barrage of crossbow fire and turn this into a battle of close quarters, a battle the goblins could not possibly win.
  • "In a society so entirely given up to the pursuit of wealth and worldly advantage of every sort, those who were trying to hold up the standard of righteousness and to alleviate the lot of their fellow beings should be remembered with gratitude. Among the multitude of inventions were many that were calculated to relieve the laborer of his severest tasks, to mitigate suffering, to ward off disease, and to lighten the load of mankind in various ways. Large sums of money were given for hospitals, charitable institutions, and colleges, and for other kinds of philanthropic work, while private benevolences were not uncommon. There was prosperity, too, of a certain kind, and some people were happy, or thought themselves so. In the records of that as of every period of our history, it is possible to find rays of light if we search for them, and I tell you these things in order that you may get a fair understanding of the situation, for in what follows you will see something of the other side.
  • From a glance I caught of Aiken's face I knew he was regretting now, with even more reason than before, that he had not remained at the coast, and I felt very sorry for him. Now that he was in trouble and not patronizing me and poking fun at me, I experienced a strong change of feeling toward him. He was the only friend I had in Honduras, and as between him and these strangers who had received us so oddly, I felt that, although it would be to my advantage to be friends with the greater number, my loyalty was owing to Aiken. So I scrambled up beside him and panted out with some difficulty, for the ascent was a steep one: "If there is any row, I'm with you, Aiken."
  • My friend, said Charlie, "we are taking mean advantage again! And, behold! like the other pair, they are flitting from the scene, though not quite in the same fashion."
  • On the 14th, the British army concentrated on the field of their former glory, in consequence of a part of the French army having effected the passage of the river, above Alba de Tormes. On the 15th, the whole of the enemy's force having passed the river, a cannonade commenced early in the day; and it was the general belief that, ere night, a second battle of Salamanca would be recorded. But, as all the French armies in Spain were now united in our front, and out-numbered us so far, Lord Wellington, seeing no decided advantage to be gained by risking a battle, at length ordered a retreat, which we commenced about three in the afternoon. Our division halted for the night at the entrance of a forest about four miles from Salamanca.
  • Along with secular Tuareg rebels they took advantage of chaos after military coup to seize an area of the Sahara Desert larger than France.
  • Roland's adversary was already at his post, hat and cloak removed. The surgeon and the two seconds stood aside. The spot had been so well chosen that neither had any advantage of sun or ground. Roland tossed off hat and coat, stationed himself forty paces from M. de Barjols, facing him. Both, one to right the other to the left, cast a glance at the same horizon. The aspect harmonized with the terrible solemnity of the scene about to take place.
  • Sasha was aware that she had nearly been killed, but thankfully she was almost in a full Mahann state and wasnt feeling emotion right now. She was taking full advantage of the Mahann and the magic making her stronger. She was acting as the center of the mental network with everyone connected through her. She could sense the changes Legon and Arkin were making to spells, and who Kovos was going to decapitate next. Sara was keeping her busy with a steady amount of arrows which were quickly running out. Keither, however, was not connected. He was too scared; his mind was closed. Not that Sasha would have let him in with his current level of fear. She couldnt have an unstable emotion clogging her network.
  • Never at a loss for words, the mayor responded with a sharpened tongue. "These men confronted you because your giant friend there failed to follow the instructions we agreed upon. I was to help your guests reach the church and you would keep from causing a panic in the streets. I'm sure you saw the commotion you caused. What were my men supposed to do? Ignore it? No, I'm afraid not. If you are upset by what has occurred, it is your own fault. It also appears as if some of your other guests were unwilling to take advantage of my escorts." His eyes first washed over the giant, but they soon found the dwarves. Their hardened faces stared back at him as he noted their peculiar features. The hoods of the algors hid their faces from him, but their appearance was already reported to him. He nodded to Jon and Tun. "It seems there are other interesting things that you wish to keep hidden from me. These two I assume are dwarves. They've entered this town without my knowledge. Another breach of our agreement. Are they going to accompany you to Sanctum?"
  • The cradle was simply a piece of flat board, with a bit of scarlet cloth fastened down each side of it. First of all, the mother laid the poor infant, which was quite naked, sprawling on the ground. A dirty-looking dog took advantage of this to sneak forward and smell at it, whereupon the mother seized a heavy piece of wood, and hit the dog such a rap over the nose as sent it away howling. Then she spread a thick layer of soft moss on the wooden board. Above this she laid a very neat, small blanket, about two feet in length. Upon this she placed the baby, which objected at first to go to bed, squalled a good deal, and kicked a little. The mother therefore took it up, turned it over, gave it one or two hearty slaps, and laid it down again.
  • "One more matter: I shall expect the discipline on shore to be as good as it has been on board ship. The natives are to be treated well, and all that we get from them shall be by fair barter, and it shall be conducted for the advantage of all.
  • There were but few Southerners in the state in comparison to the number of Northerners, yet the former had made a brave fight to keep the state for the South. There had been many deeds of violence on the part of the Southerners and on the part of the Northerners, too. But the number of people whose convictions were of the kind for which they would gladly die were no less, no more, on either side. It was a time in which there was much lawlessness and many of the outlaws took advantage of the great difference in the convictions of the two sides to make the cause of the North and the South an excuse for lawlessness.
  • Reginald was much of the same opinion. But neither he nor anyone else of those concerned had any idea what to do next. The Persian Ambassador took advantage of the afternoon quiet at Sandringham to point out to Lord Birlesmere that if this were true, and if it were due to the relic of which he had spoken, and if the news were telegraphed abroad the most serious consequences might ensue. Lord Birlesmere took note of his Excellency's communication, and, later on, got through to Rivington Court on the telephone. He had met Sheldrake two or three times and Angus came to speak. But when he understood that the Foreign Secretary was hinting at a personal interview he gave a little laugh.
  • These men held the opinion that Indians were "vermin," to exterminate which was commendable. When, therefore, they discovered our camp by the light of the fires, they rode towards it with the utmost caution, taking advantage of every bush and knoll until our sentinels observed them. Then they rushed upon us like a hurricane, sending a volley of bullets before them.
  • I laughed, noting that whatever ailed Celestine, it didn't seem to prevent one from having a sense of irony. She then took advantage of my sudden openness to press her sexual agenda.
  • From here, the Dark Moon Fells were out of sight behind the rise. What was more significant, Tanngrisnir thought, as he rode at the centre of the column, was that the location of the swart-elf army was equally obscure. He considered what he would do in Prince Helgrims position. The swart-elf knew that his dragons gave him a massive advantage over the dwarves. Would he fling them into action immediately, or try to lull the dwarves into a false sense of security? He had been raiding outlying settlements. Did he intend to draw the dwarves out? If so, it had succeeded. But why was the Prince not pressing the advantage?
  • There are as many of us, when you come to figgerin' up the fightin' force, an' the advantage of takin' them by surprise will overbalance the difference in weapons.
  • That same week the first batch of 50 parolees were assembled, carefully checked off a list and marched out the gate. 50 men who had sworn an oath of loyalty to the Union were now free to go. Some prisoners jeered and called them "turncoats." The guards, too, taunted them, "Now behave Johnny Reb, or well have you back in your luxurious accommodations." And they laughed. The troop marched out the gate, into Elmira to the train depot to be shipped to City Point, Virginia for final processing. The first successful discharge reignited the debate in camp whether to resist the program or take advantage of it. There was a stigma attached for signing on. Certain only was that the next 50 places were quickly filled.
  • One of the workers told me that the janitors opened the building at 6:00 a.m. every weekday during the summer. I took advantage of the time by using Zeke's $20 to duplicate my purchase from the previous day and, instead of eating a few donuts myself, I pocketed the few extra bucks for myself, just as I had done the previous day. I arrived at the school at 6:45 a.m. and parked my bike near the front of the school so no one would see that I had arrived. The gym was near the back entrance to the school and I slipped in through one of the doors, so I could check things out.
  • An Arab government precaution. If station agents all along the line were allowed to send telegrams every seditious upstart would take advantage of it and they'd have more trouble than they've got now. But I warn you fellows, after Deraa--somewhere between the border and Damascus--there'll be a fight. The minute they discover that the letter is a fake they'll come for the real one like cats after a canary.
  • The next day the entire remainder of the supplies and equipment of the camp were made up into packs and the party started over the portage to where the boats had been left lower down on the river. Roger, being accommodated with a pack weighing about ninety pounds, felt as though he were back in the Minnesota swamps, with the tump strap over his forehead. His familiarity with packing, and his ability to take the trip without feeling any physical inconvenience, was a source of gratification, as Roger's pride was keen not to be thought in any sense a less able member of the party than the oldest and most seasoned hand. The journey down to the lower end of the canyon did not seem so long, and, as on the previous day, the party reached the lower camp about noon. In the afternoon Gersup and Bulson, taking Roger with them, took advantage of the half day to make a survey before descending into the beaches of the lower Cantwell River.
  • stopped and stared at his hands resting on his knees. Something about his last thought was bothering him though he knew he wouldnt analyse it too much. Every so often a certain phrase would catch in his brain like a stuck record, a chant mechanically repeated over and over again for no apparent reason until he fell into a kind of trance. Tonight it washad no right, had no right’. A drop of whisky usually put a stop to that, too. He was not an alcoholic, though he sometimes wanted to give the impression that he was. The hip flask was merely handy, pretty much like cigarettes or nervous habits are handy; they offer refuge. Whisky had the added advantage of muddling his thoughts
  • "I say we show fight anyway," said Button. "In the first place, they don't know we are here and in the second we have the advantage of taking them by surprise. Billy, you can butt them while Stubby bites their heels and I will run up their backs and scratch the shirts off their shoulders."
  • Any time, Any place, Anywhere. Popular texting abbreviation (ack J Lewis). The expression actually originated from a 1960s/70s Martini TV advert in which the song went: Any time, any place, anywhere, There's a magical world we can share (??), It's the right one, it's the bright one, It's (Thats ?) Martini... Other variations of lyrics following the opening line were used in more recent years (It's a new world, Me and you girl..). Suggestions on a postcard please as to the original words (and ad agency, composer, etc), and later versions. The word Martini in the context of media has now assumed an amusing additional modern meaning, referring to mobile and on-demand communications and media, and is also used as an ironic reference to someone exhibiting particularly flexible or pragmatic tendencies, especially politicians who pander to views and support for personal advantage above ethical considerations.
  • "Peccavimus you should have said," remarked Raymond, whom Waymouth was passing as he hurried from gun to gun to assure himself that all were being fought to the best advantage.
  • It would not have been an easy task had they not worn the uniforms of aviators. But once these were noted, they were welcomed with smiles, and though at the first place they applied there was no room, the proprietor busied himself to such advantage that the boys were soon settled in a big double room with a fine view of a busy section of Paris.
  • Bought-out Deal The sale of securities under a negotiated agreement between an issuer and the investing institution, as an alternative to a PUBLIC ISSUE. The intent on the part of the buyer is to offload the securities later in the market at a profit. Bought-out deals are commonplace in issues of the Over the Counter Exchange of India (OTCEI). The advantage to the issuing company is the saving in time and cost that a public issue would entail. It is a big help to unlisted companies and projects, which must see through a gestation period before tapping the PRIMARY MARKET. For institutions and MUTUAL FUNDS, the route is another avenue for investing funds. However, there could be some disadvantages to the issuer such as interference by the INSTITUTIONAL INVESTOR or restrictive CONVENANTS in the initial subscription agreement. On the other hand, the institutional investor or the sponsor in OTCEI deals, bears the risk of capital loss due to a fall in the price of the securities.
  • He scaled that precipitous rock with the rapidity and self-confidence of a gray squirrel running up the trunk of a hickory tree, squirrel-like, taking advantage of every crack, cranny and projection that could be grasped by fingers or moccasin-covered toes.
  • "In this way peace had come in one department of labor, but war still raged among the manufacturers and in the building and other trades. The workingmen literally held the reins in society, but did not know enough to drive away from the rocks. Instead of taking advantage of shorter hours and higher wages to improve their minds and prepare themselves for a better condition, they were too apt to waste their energies in denouncing the capitalists and in trying to force still greater concessions from their unwilling employers. They would loudly demand that every ancient wrong endured by them should be redressed, and then, to show their idea of right, they would compel a builder, in the middle of a contract, where time was more precious than money, to give them higher wages than had been agreed on; or they would boycott to bankruptcy a small shopkeeper who innocently bought goods that happened to be made by non-union workmen.
  • Shaa peered over the rim of his own mug, sniffed. "You have a point. Still, you are on the run, so by definition you need every possible advantage you can get."
  • 1. Performance Royalties Under Blanket Licenses. Licensor reserves the exclusive right to collect, whether individually or via a performance rights society (e.g. ASCAP, BMI, SESAC), royalties for the public performance or public digital performance (e.g. webcast) of the Work if that performance is primarily intended for or directed toward commercial advantage or private monetary compensation.
  • But this Spanish commander knew his business, which was more than could truthfully be said for the Barbados Militia. Having gained the advantage of a surprise blow, which had put the fort out of action, he soon showed them that he was master of the situation. His guns turned now upon the open space behind the mole, where the incompetent Bishop had marshalled his men, tore the militia into bloody rags, and covered the landing parties which were making the shore in their own boats and in several of those which had rashly gone out to the great ship before her identity was revealed.
  • Since he was half of the management team, Jameson liked to allow him to sit in the managers room so they could talk about meaningless shit. I cant blame Lewis for taking advantage of it. I probably would have too, even if it meant talking with an asshole like Jameson.
  • Appetite had ever been a staunch friend to Miles Milton. It did not fail him now. Soldier-life has usually the effect of making its devotees acutely careful to take advantage of all opportunities! He set to work on the bowlful of food with a will, and was not solicitous to ascertain what it consisted of until it was safely washed down with a draught from the jug. Being then too late to enter on an inquiry as to its nature, he contented himself with a pleasing recollection that the main body of the compost was rice, one of the constituents oil, and that the whole was by no means bad. He also wished that there had been more of it, and then resumed his previous--and only possible--amusement of meditation.
  • Great caution was required in approaching these formidable looking animals, and the hunters took advantage of every bit of cover afforded by rocks and inequalities of the ground, so as to get within easy range of them and cut off their retreat to the sea.
  • His supposed enemy did not fail to make a report of her success, and to magnify every advantage they had gained; believing, in good earnest, that her lady's warmth was the effect of a real passion for the fortunate Mr. Fathom. But he himself viewed the adventure in a different light, and rightly imputed the violence of Mademoiselle's behaviour to the contradiction she had sustained from her maid, or to the fire of her natural generosity glowing in behalf of innocence traduced. Nevertheless, he was perfectly well pleased with the nature of the contest; because, in the course of such debates, he foresaw that he should become habitually her hero, and that, in time, she would actually believe those exaggerations of his merit, which she herself had feigned, for the honour of her own arguments.
  • is a strategy to enhance opportunities for long-term returns by spreading investments within an asset class to take advantage of gains by particular individual investments while mitigating the risk of losses by others. For example, investments in stocks can be divided into combinations of large cap/small cap, growth/value, and domestic/foreign to diversify within that asset class.
  • These several orders were executed; and the yacht lay rocking, with scarcely any progressive motion, on the sluggish surges, which all at once began to heave and swell, as if lifted by some vast and mysterious power beneath. She was nearly divested of her canvass, yet still beautiful in her nakedness, showing to advantage the graceful symmetry of her tapering spars, and the exquisite shape and proportions of her hull. Like a bird seated on the water, she yielded to every undulation of the heaving billows with a grace that seemed the instinct of life.
  • He fooled Daylight completely. At the end of half an hour of goodness, Daylight, lured into confidence, was riding along at a walk and rolling a cigarette, with slack knees and relaxed seat, the reins lying on the animal's neck. Bob whirled abruptly and with lightning swiftness, pivoting on his hind legs, his fore legs just lifted clear of the ground. Daylight found himself with his right foot out of the stirrup and his arms around the animal's neck; and Bob took advantage of the situation to bolt down the road. With a hope that he should not encounter Dede Mason at that moment, Daylight regained his seat and checked in the horse.
  • As the Bird boys were thoroughly imbued with the aviator spirit it might easily be set down as positive that as time went on they would continue to study the science of flying, and take advantage of every opportunity that presented itself for indulging in their favorite sport.
  • Well, I'm sorry, boys, Cameron observed, "that you won't take advantage of the offer I'm making you. I brought a basket of provisions with me, and you might be having a square meal in five minutes if you'd only do what I ask you to do."
  • The storm didnt hit all at once. There was thunder and lightning and a torrential downpour during which the royalists huddled in their leaky tents and prayed they wouldnt be struck dead and hoped that the spooked, hobbled horses wouldnt scatter too far. Then there was a brief respite when the sun and patches of blue actually appeared in the sky. Longsword took advantage of it by putting the mangonel to use but was only able to take four or five ineffectual shots before the clouds rapidly piled up again and broke open. The men ran back to the relative shelter of the tents so quickly that the supply of prepared missiles was forgotten and left behind and when the storm finally moved on and Longsword went out to the mangonel, he discovered that the pounding rain had rinsed most of the fat from the cloths, making them impossible to light.
  • There they struggled together--a struggle that could not long continue for lack of wind, it was so cat-o'-mountain in the franticness of its activity, life the victor's prize. Twice while it lasted those solitudes heard reports of gun-fire--Rolls firing; but without hurt to the other, who had the advantage of being much the younger, of being considerably the bigger, of being uppermost to begin with: advantages over which that inveterate toughness of Rolls might not have prevailed, if Macray had not let go Rolls' left hand to snatch his sheath-knife, and finish it. In that same second Rolls had him overthrown, undone, and under....
  • Great,’ muttered Ben as he moved back into the relative shelter of the jungle. He realised that the cleared land was the end of the light aircraft runway. He remained in the cover of the wet jungle and followed the runway back into the interior of the island. Rain was driven in frenzied sheets by the wind. It drummed against the large leafed plants. Ben moved slowly, stopping at frequent intervals to listen for sounds. The rain drowned out any hope of hearing soft sounds but also gave Ben the same advantage as he moved forward.
  • This was pure bluff, as Dave, being under twenty-one, had no right to make an arrest, even as a citizen. But he saw that he had the Greek scared, and he resolved to push his advantage to the limit.
  • They are more than two to one, literally, growled the general, fiercely, as he felt that there was nothing to be done but to summon his men to follow, and, taking advantage of the fresher state of their horses, put on all the speed they could, and make for a valley right ahead, where they might elude their pursuers, and accepting the present defeat endeavour to make up for it another time.
  • The buck bounded up a steep slope, and with one tremendous leap cleared a craggy rock in his path. He had barely done so, when the young Shawanoe was after him, going over with a lightness and grace that showed no special effort. The pursuer was on his haunches, and the animal, with glaring eyeballs and a horrified sniff, seemed to bound off with the speed of the wind. But of what avail? The warrior was not to be shaken off. With a speed which none of his race could equal, it was only play for him to outrun the deer. Years before (as I have told in another place), Deerfoot, for mere sport, pursued one of the fleetest of horses, and kept it up hour after hour, until he ran down the steed. He was doing the same to the buck. There was not a moment from the first when he could not have launched an arrow that would have brought the game to the ground; he was near enough to drive his tomahawk into the neck, but he did nothing of that nature. Inasmuch as he was running the race, he meant it should be a fair one, and neither should take any advantage over the other.
  • California's large number of endemic species includes relict species, which have died out elsewhere, such as the Catalina Ironwood (Lyonothamnus floribundus). Many other endemics originated through differentiation or adaptive radiation, whereby multiple species develop from a common ancestor to take advantage of diverse ecological conditions such as the California lilac (Ceanothus). Many California endemics have become endangered, as urbanization, logging, overgrazing, and the introduction of exotic species have encroached on their habitat.
  • I turned sharply round, and beheld a column of bright flame shooting high up into the night-air. An exclamation of bitter chagrin escaped me, for I knew well what it was. After I had got the fire kindled down in the thicket on our arrival, I had noticed that I had laid it close to the roots of a dead fir-tree, the branches of which were covered to the top with a species of dried moss. At the time I knew that there was danger in this, but as our fire was to be very small, and to be extinguished the moment we were done with it, I had allowed it to remain rather than be at the trouble of shifting and rekindling it. I afterwards found that Big Otter had left the fire in charge of Salamander, and gone to shift the position of the horses; and Salamander had left it to fetch water from a neighbouring spring. Thus left to itself, the fire took advantage of the chance to blaze up; the moss on the dead tree had caught fire, and the instantaneous result was a blaze that told of our whereabouts to whoever might be on the look-out within ten or fifteen miles of us in every direction.
  • "You probably shouldve known better than to take advantage of me that way. Anyway, Ive got to get to social studies."
  • Covering a range of sectors, they have the advantage of providing common, objectively verifiable measures of progress in world development.
  • Notwithstanding these reflections, he would not lay aside an idea which so agreeably flattered his imagination. He, like every other projector in the same circumstances, was so partial to his own qualifications, as to think the lady would soon perceive a difference between him and Renaldo that could not fail to turn to his advantage in her opinion. He depended a good deal on the levity and inconstancy of the sex; and did not doubt that, in the course of their acquaintance, he should profit by that languor which often creeps upon and flattens the intercourse of lovers cloyed with the sight and conversation of each other.
  • Vending machine franchise takes advantage of and benefits from two major uk growth sectors.
  • I have never had any reason to suppose otherwise, Senor, answered Alvaros. "But even were the Senorita to entertain any foolish objections--or imagine that she entertained them--I presume it would make no difference in your decision. If she does not actually entertain any sentiment of love for me at this moment I have not a shadow of doubt as to my ability to inspire that sentiment as soon as we are married. The young lady will raise no objection, I presume, if she is given to understand that the marriage would be in conformity with your wishes; and I imagine it is quite unnecessary for me to point out to you how very greatly to your advantage and that of your whole family such a marriage would be."
  • They took advantage of this fact to explain to them that this distance was obtained by measuring the parallax of the moon.
  • Since daybreak matters had assumed a very serious, if not desperate aspect for the troops of the League to the south of London. Communication had entirely ceased with the Tsar since the night before, and this could only mean that his Majesty had lost the command of the air, through the destruction or disablement of his fleet of aerostats. News from the force which had descended upon London told only of a fearful expenditure of life that had not purchased the slightest advantage.
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